• Common Rosacea Triggers

    If you have rosacea, you may struggle to manage the persistent redness in your cheeks. While a flushed face is the most common symptom, others include visible blood vessels in the cheeks, red or bulbous nose, acne-like sores, a stinging feeling in the face, and itchy or watery eyes. Rosacea is medically harmless, but it can make you feel very self-conscious. 

    One of the best ways to minimize your symptoms is to avoid rosacea triggers. Here are some of the most common sources of flare-ups among patients with this skin condition.  

    Weather-Related Rosacea Triggers 

    • High heat  
    • High humidity 
    • Cold weather 
    • Windy conditions 
    • Direct sunlight 

    Dietary Rosacea Triggers 

    • Alcohol, especially red wine, beer, bourbon, gin, vodka, and champagne 
    • Hot drinks such as hot chocolate, cider, coffee, or tea 
    • Spicy foods 
    • Dairy products, including yogurt, sour cream, and cheese (cottage cheese is okay) 
    • Chocolate and vanilla 
    • Yeast extract (bread is okay) 
    • Citrus fruits, tomatoes, bananas, red plums, figs, and raisins 
    • Vinegar and soy sauce 
    • Liver, eggplant, spinach, and avocado 
    • Lime beans, navy beans, and peas 
    • Pickled or fermented foods 
    • Cured meats 

    Emotional Rosacea Triggers 

    • High stress 
    • Anxiety 
    • Sudden changes of emotion 

    Lifestyle Rosacea Triggers 

    • Saunas and hot baths 
    • Chlorinated swimming pools 
    • Excessively warm environments 
    • Strenuous exercise 
    • Lift-and-load jobs 

    Medical Rosacea Triggers 

    • Some prescription drugs, including topical steroids, vasodilators, and others 
    • Chronic coughing 
    • Menopause 
    • Caffeine withdrawal 

    Skin and Hair Care Rosacea Triggers 

    • Cosmetics containing alcohol, witch hazel, or artificial fragrances 
    • Hydro-alcoholic or acetone products 
    • Substances that cause redness or stinging 

    Tracking Your Rosacea Triggers 

    We recommend writing down each trigger in a journal and recording how your skin responds after being exposed to each one. The National Rosacea Society has a trigger-tracking form you can print off for this purpose. Armed with an understanding of your triggers, you may be able to make changes to your daily routine that keep your symptoms under control. 

    Treatment Options for Rosacea 

    Unfortunately, rosacea doesn’t have a cure. However, in addition to avoiding your triggers, you can also pursue treatment options that make your condition less prominent. Some of these include Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) photorejuvenation therapyVbeam Perfecta Pulsed Dye Laser (PDL), and topical creams applied directly to the skin.  

    If you think you might have rosacea, or you’re eager to find a treatment option that works for you, please contact Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology in Salt Lake City, UT at (801) 682-4715 to schedule an appointment with one of our board-certified dermatologists. 

  • Skin Mole Mapping

    It’s perfectly normal to have up to 60 moles by the time you’re 25. You may have had a few when you were born, but most moles develop gradually into adulthood. Most moles are simply cosmetic changes to the skin and will never cause problems. However, keeping an eye on new and changing moles can help you catch skin cancer early. The trick to knowing every inch of your body is to print out a body mole map and record what you see over time. 

    Begin with a Skin Cancer Self-Examination 

    While it’s recommended that you see a dermatologist for professional skin cancer screenings once a year, this is something you should also do at home once a month. The most common places for skin cancer to develop include the face, chest, arms, calves, and other places that receive the most sun exposure.  

    Still, skin cancer can develop anywhere, so be sure to take a good look at every part of your body during a skin self-exam. Remember to check your underarms, between your fingers and toes, the palms of your hands, the soles of your feet, and your scalpUse a full-length mirror and a hand mirror or get help from another person to examine hard-to-see areas. 

    Record Your Moles 

    The American Academy of Dermatology has a skin cancer body mole map you can download for free. You’ll see that the chart includes the front and back of your body, your head from four different angles, and the bottoms of your feet. 

    As you examine your skin, mark your moles in the appropriate places on the map and number them as you go. Then, there’s a place to document the characteristics of each mole for your records. 

    Print out 12 copies of the body mole map for each person in your family so everyone can fill it out once a month for a year. This makes it easy to see which moles are changing or taking on concerning characteristics as the months go by. 

    Know the Warning Signs of Skin Cancer 

    Becoming intimately familiar with the locations and traits of your moles is important because cancerous moles have unique characteristics. If you notice any of ABCDEs of skin cancer, call a dermatologist right away. These include: 

    • Asymmetrical moles, where one half looks different from the other 
    • Borders that are irregular, scalloped, or poorly defined 
    • Colors that vary from one part of the mole to another 
    • Diameter that exceeds the size of a pencil eraser (6mm) 
    • Evolving moles that change color, shape, or size relatively rapidly 

    At Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology, we have more than 30 years of experience providing skin cancer treatment to Utah residents. Our team of board-certified dermatologists can provide the effective, compassionate service you’re looking for. If you have any troubling moles, or you’re looking for dermatology services in Salt Lake City, please contact Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology online or call us at (801) 682-4715. 

  • Avoid These Common Skin Care Fails

    You strive to take good care of your skin every day, but are you sure you’re doing everything right? Here are some of the most common skin care fails we hear about and how to avoid them. 

    Forgetting Your Hands and Décolletage  

    Most people’s skin care routine only includes their face. However, the hands and décolletage (comprised of the neck, shoulders, upper chest, and upper back) are also highly visible areas of skin that can develop signs of aging. 

    The easiest way to protect these sensitive parts of your body is to wear sunscreen and other forms of sun protection. For a more significant anti-aging effect, consider trying retinol or retinoid products. 

    Failing to Moisturize Oily Skin 

    People commonly fall for this skin care fail because it stands to reason that oily skin doesn’t need additional hydration. However, excessive oiliness could be the skin’s way of compensating for lack of hydration. Because of this, starting a healthy moisturizing routine could actually improve the condition of your skin. 

    If you have an oily complexion, make sure you choose a lightweight, oil-free moisturizer. If you also have sensitive skin, avoid artificial ingredients, including coloring agents and fragrances. 

    Over Exfoliating 

    Exfoliation is necessary to remove dead skin cells and other debris that stick to your skin. It’s so effective that it can instantly improve the look and feel of your complexion. In the long term, exfoliation improves cellular turnover, which can decrease the onset of visible aging. 

    However, it’s possible to have too much of a good thing. Exfoliating every day or with too much intensity can cause irritation and inflammation. If you remove dead skin cells mechanically (by scrubbing your face with a washcloth or loofa), you can exfoliate up to three or four times a week. If you prefer using chemical exfoliation (by applying mild acids that react with your skin), limit yourself to once or twice a week.  

    Failing to Wash Your Face Before Bed 

    Leaving makeup on overnight prevents your pores from breathing. This can lead to dullness, dryness, irritation, and acne breakouts. Even if you don’t wear makeup, you should wash your face before bed to remove sweat, dirt, and pollutants from your skin. Failing to do so could disrupt the overnight cell turnover process, accelerating the signs of aging as a result. 

    Sleeping on a Dirty Pillowcase 

    As you can imagine, pressing your face against a grimy, old pillowcase for eight hours a night isn’t good for your skin. Launder it once a week, along with the rest of your bedding, to ensure only clean sheets and pillowcases come in contact with your skin all night long. 

    At Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology, we offer cosmetic skin care services and dermatologist-recommended skin care products to help you look and feel your best. For more help protecting your skin, please contact us online or call (801) 682-4715 and schedule an appointment with a board-certified dermatologist in Salt Lake City, UT. 

  • Winter Hair Care

    Do you sometimes feel like you’d be better off keeping your winter hair under a hat for the whole season? Winter can be rough on hair, leaving it with split ends and breakage. It’s not just the cold weather that’s harsh, it’s the wind, the static electricity, and the dry heat indoors. How can you maintain lush locks in the face of all that damage? We’ve got some tips. 

    • Wear a hat. No, we don’t mean to hide your hair all season long! But when you’re going outside, a hat can protect your hair from dry air, snow, wind, and rain. If your hair is particularly prone to breakage, be careful of the fabric of your hat. Line wool or cotton hats with silk or satin to protect against damage, and use a dry oil spray to fight static electricity under the hat while moisturizing your hair.  
    • Don’t over-shampoo. Washing your hair too often can leave you with a dry, flaky scalp and strip your hair of its natural oils. If you normally wash every day, take it back to every other day, and if it’s still dry try every three days. If you have trouble going that long, try some dry shampoo in between washes, to freshen your hairstyle and keep your hair smelling good.  
    • Keep your hair hydrated. No matter your hair type, extra moisture will help combat the effects of dry air. An oil-based moisturizer will help lock in moisture, revitalizing dry, damaged hair. A leave-in conditioner can help prevent fly-away hair that static brings, too. Want to go one extra step? Fight the dry air in your house by using a humidifier, and you’ll be doing your hair a favor too. 
    • Change your style. Get your hair trimmed regularly, to get rid of split ends. Normally a blond? Consider a darker hue in winter, to prevent the damage done by bleach. If you typically style dry, straighten, or curl your hair using heat, now is the time to explore new styles that won’t dry and damage it.  
    • Deep condition once a week. Weekly, let conditioner stay on your hair for 30 minutes so that it can really penetrate the hair shaft. A weekly hair mask is a great idea, too, providing softness, hydration, and shine.  
    • Careful with the waterShampoo with lukewarm water, followed by a cool rinse, and never leave the house with wet hair.  

    Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology is committed to providing superior, professional skin care in a manner that’s practical, efficient, and compassionate. With over 30 years of experience providing dermatological services in Salt Lake City, we provide a variety of services, from cosmetic skincare to treatment for skin cancer. Our team of board-certified dermatologists and licensed cosmetic service providers, along with our friendly staff, are here to provide you the care you need in a comfortable and professional atmosphere. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact us through our website or call (801) 682-4715 today.  

  • Taking Care of your Nails in the Winter

    Winter is a harsh season that can really take a toll on your body. It seems to suck all the moisture out of your skin, make your hair brittle and lifeless, and the dry air is especially hard on hands. How can you keep your nails healthy and beautiful, even in the midst of rough winter weather? We’ve got some tips.  

    • Keep them covered. Naked nails are unprotected: when you put on a base coat, polish, and topcoat, you’re keeping them safe from harm. When you’re changing out your nail polish, use acetone polish remover to take it off quickly, and always apply nail polish to clean nails.  
    • Moisture is key to nail health. Cold, dry air can really mess with your nails, making them vulnerable to splitting, peeling, and breaking. It’s also terrible for your cuticles, causing cracked, bleeding cuticles and painful hangnails. How do you prevent all of this? Once a week, coat your nails and cuticles with cuticle oil and wear cotton gloves for at least an hour. In between, slather on the lotion several times a day, putting cuticle oil at least once a day, too. Pick a lotion with a humectant to lock in moisture, and at night, apply a heavy hand cream.  Another smart moisture move? Keep the air in your home moist by using a humidifier.  
    • Don’t confuse water for moisture. This may seem counterintuitive: as much as nails need moisture, water is bad for them. Fingernails absorb water, pushing necessary oils out, and causing them to expand and become weak. Keep your nails as dry as you can, and when you take a shower, make sure there’s even polish at the tips of the nails, to seal them. Washing dishes? Never do it without wearing gloves.  
    • Wear gloves outside, too. They’ll protect your hands from the cold temperatures, as well as the damp of snow or rain and the bitter winds of winter. What’s more, gloves will protect your nails when you have to use your hands to do things like cleaning snow or frost off a windshield.  
    • Flexible is better than strongYou might think that nail strengtheners will protect nails against breaking, but in fact, strengtheners and hardeners make them more prone to breakage. Along with cuticle oil and lotion, a good basecoat will keep them strong and flexible.  

    When you need help caring for your skin and nails, Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology is committed to providing superior, professional skin care in a manner that’s practical, efficient, and compassionate. With over 30 years of experience providing dermatological services in Salt Lake City, we provide a wide range of services, from cosmetic skincare to treatment for skin cancer. Our team of board-certified dermatologists and licensed cosmetic service providers, along with our friendly staff, can provide the care you need in a comfortable and professional atmosphere. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact us through our website or call (801) 682-4715 today.

  • Importance of Sunscreen in the Winter

    We all know that it’s important to slather ourselves in sunscreen during the summer months, but do you think about sunscreen in the winter? When it’s cool outside, and probably overcast, most of us don’t think about putting on sunscreen as we layer on the clothing. Does it surprise you to know that many experts feel it’s just as important to wear sunscreen in the winter as it is in summer? 

    If you’re out in the ice and snow, you may already realize that you need sunscreen. Snow and ice reflect the sun, and can, in fact, reflect up to 90 percent of UV rays. If you’re participating in snowy winter sports like skiing, you should be applying sunscreen every three to four hours to any exposed part of your body. You should also be wearing sunglasses, to protect your eyes from all that glare.  

    But what if you live somewhere with no snow? Do you still need to wear sunscreen when it’s gray and gross outside? Yes, and there’s a very good, scientific reason for it. When it’s colder, the ozone layer is thinner. In fact, the ozone layer is at its thinnest in the winter months, which means we’re more vulnerable to harmful UV rays. The sun’s rays are strongest in the middle of the day, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so make sure you wear sunscreen any time you’re outside during those hours, no matter what the season may be.  

    What kind of sunscreen should you be wearing in the winter? If you’re active, look for one that’s specially formulated for winter sports. Your sunscreen should have an SPF of at least 30, though going higher than 30 won’t necessarily offer significantly more protection. That’s because, at SPF 30, 97 percent of the harmful UV rays are already blocked, so there’s not much more protection needed. Your sunscreen should be moisturizing, as well, because windburn can be brutal during the winter months if your skin is unprotected. It’s also wise to wear a lip balm that contains a sunscreen, to keep your lips from becoming burned and chapped.  

    If you’re looking for a partner to help you protect your skin, you can trust Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology. At Swinyer-Woseth, we’re committed to providing superior, professional skin care in a manner that’s practical and efficient, yet compassionate. With more than 30 years of experience providing dermatological services in Salt Lake City, we provide a wide range of services, from cosmetic skincare to treatment for skin cancer. Our team of board-certified dermatologists and licensed cosmetic service providers, along with our friendly staff, are here to provide you the care you need in a comfortable and professional atmosphere. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact us through our website or call (801) 682-4715 today.  

  • Eczema in Winter

    If you’re suddenly feeling itchy this winter, it could be eczema. Although it’s typically diagnosed in childhood, eczema can occur for the first time at any age. In the winter, eczema often flares up because of dry air, causing red, inflamed, dry skin. How do you know if your itchy skin is eczema? And if it is, how do you treat it? 

    Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, causes a dry, scaly, itchy rash. This condition is so itchy, in fact, that people with eczema may have trouble sleeping. In addition to severe itching, symptoms of eczema include dry, scaly patches on the skin that are red to brownish-grey, small raised bumps that leak fluid and scab when scratched, thick, cracked, dry, scaly skin, and raw, sensitive skin. When dry winter air, intensified by the dry air of indoor heat, meets too many layers of clothing, too many bed coverings, and hot baths, an eczema flare-up is likely.  

    This troublesome condition can also be caused by fungi, soaps and shampoos, lotions, alcohol, detergents, dryer sheets, and other irritants. You might have eczema because of an allergy to something like latex, nickel, aloe vera, or Vitamin E. If you’re dealing with eczema, what can you do?  

    • First of all, skip the hot baths and showers. Heat can dry out your skin, so use warm water and bathe or shower less frequently than usual. Don’t rub your skin with a towel, but simply pat dry.  
    • Be careful with the things that touch your skin. Use gentle moisturizing soap, free from fragrance and dye, and avoid bubble baths. Be careful with your laundry detergent too, steering clear of anything harsh. Dress in breathable fabrics, and avoid too many layers of clothing or bedding. 
    • Keep your skin well-hydrated. Drink plenty of water, use plenty of lotion, and moisten your home’s air with a humidifier.  
    • Try some Vitamin D. There’s research to indicate that vitamin D can help with eczema flare-ups, whether taken in supplement form or through the use of UV lights.  
    • Talk to your dermatologist. There are many therapeutic options for the treatment of eczema, including topical creams, antihistamines, and prescription medications. Sometimes, the best treatment for eczema is not a treatment at all. Discovering what’s causing the condition can help you determine how to avoid it in the future. Having a dermatologist you can trust can help you find the source of the issue.  

    Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology is committed to providing superior, professional skin care in a manner that’s practical, efficient, and compassionate. With more than 30 years of experience providing dermatological services in Salt Lake City, we provide a variety of services, from cosmetic skincare to treatment for skin cancer. Our team of board-certified dermatologists and licensed cosmetic service providers, along with our friendly staff, are here to provide you the care you need in a comfortable and professional atmosphere. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact us through our website or call (801) 682-4715 

  • Top 5 Myths about sensitive skin

    If you have sensitive skin, you probably struggle to keep it clear and healthy. You may be frustrated by products that say they’re for sensitive skin but still irritate yours, and you may be worried that you’ll have sensitive skin forever, no matter what you do. We’d like to help you sort it all out, by busting some common myths about sensitive skin.

    • Myth 1: Sensitive skin is all the same. The word sensitive means different things to different people. If your skin is sensitive, you might be prone to redness, inflammation, peeling, or itching. Certain ingredients and formulas might make your skin sting or burn, or your skin might break out when you switch beauty products. Sensitive skin is reactive instead of adaptive: it reacts to its environment. The key to caring for it is to find products that clean and nourish your skin without irritating it.
    • Myth 2: It’s unusual to have sensitive skin. Sensitive skin is very common, and because it’s so prevalent, much research has been conducted to discover how best to care for it. While only 11 percent of skincare products are designed for sensitive skin, you will be able to find some that work for you if you shop around.
    • Myth 3: Sensitive skin will always be sensitive. Many factors come into play with sensitive skin, and stress may be the biggest. The stress hormone, Cortisol, weakens the immune system and damages the skin barrier, so when you’re stressed, your skin feels more sensitive. Because more than 70 percent of women report moderate to high stress, it’s important to find products specially formulated to improve the health of stressed skin.
    • Myth 4: If you’ve got sensitive skin, you should only wash it with water. While you should avoid using harsh cleansers on your face, especially those with dyes or Sodium Laureth Sulfate, water won’t get your skin clean or help strengthen a compromised skin barrier. To choose a cleanser good for your sensitive skin, look for one the “dermatologist proven” label.
    • Myth 5: People with sensitive skin can’t wear makeup. Makeup isn’t really the problem; layering makeup over inflamed skin is the issue. When your skincare routine nourishes and soothes your sensitive skin, you’ll have a clean slate for applying makeup. Just make sure you remove your makeup each night, taking care not to leave behind residue that can irritate your skin.

    At Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology, we provide superior, professional skincare in a manner that’s practical, efficient, and compassionate. With more than 30 years of experience providing dermatological services in Salt Lake City, we provide a wide range of services, from cosmetic skincare to treatment for skin cancer. Our team of board-certified dermatologists and licensed cosmetic service providers, along with our friendly staff, are here to provide you the care you need in a comfortable and professional atmosphere. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact us through our website or call (801) 682-4715 today.

  • Skin Cancer Screenings 101

    How much do you know about skin cancer? In the United States, more than a million people each year are diagnosed with the two most common forms of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Less common is melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, but all of these cancers are curable if detected early. Does that mean that everyone should see a dermatologist for regular skincare screenings? Not necessarily.

    No research has been conducted to determine whether routine screening for melanoma is effective for people without a familial history of skin cancer. Periodic skin examinations by the patient or the primary care physician are typically the way changes to the skin are noticed, and those exams seem to be the key to catching skin cancer at the earliest stages. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma appear as skin changes, and the primary care doctor sends the patient to a dermatologist for a skin examination and biopsy.

    Family history raises the risk of melanoma, as does the presence of atypical moles or several common moles. Other risk factors include previous skin cancers, skin that burns easily, freckling, blue eyes, red hair, and a history of blistering sunburns. Screening people with these risk factors doesn’t seem to reduce the number of melanoma deaths.

    You should know the signs of skin cancer, and have a doctor check out anything suspicious. Watch for atypical moles, also known as dysplastic nevi, which have irregular borders, vary in color, or are asymmetrical. Learn how to identify the three major types of skin cancer.

    • Basal cell carcinoma: The most common kind of skin cancer is characterized by pearly, translucent growths that may crust, ulcerate, or bleed.
    • Squamous cell carcinoma: This looks like basal cell carcinoma but is more aggressive and can go internally.
    • Malignant melanoma: This potentially life-threatening skin cancer can arise from an existing mole, or from normal skin. Look for pigmented lesions, asymmetrical in shape, with irregular, scalloped, or jagged edges. They’re more than one color like black, blue, or brown, and show unusual thickening and dramatic growth.

    While regular screenings are not recommended, you should talk to your doctor if you experience:

    • Lesions that change from their original appearance
    • Lesions that appear differently from your other moles
    • Sores that don’t heal within one or two months
    • Lesions that are worrisome to you in any way

    At Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology, we’re committed to providing superior, professional skin care in a manner that’s practical and efficient, yet compassionate. With more than 30 years of experience providing dermatological services in Salt Lake City, we provide a wide range of services, from cosmetic skincare to treatment for skin cancer. Our team of board-certified dermatologists and licensed cosmetic service providers, along with our friendly staff, are here to provide you the care you need in a comfortable and professional atmosphere. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact us through our website or call (801) 682-4715 today.

  • Spotlight on our Cosmetic Skincare Services

    In addition to treatment for conditions like skin cancer, Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology provides a variety of cosmetic services. Our licensed cosmetic service providers offer treatment that helps you look your best and feel confident about the impression you’re making on the world. Here’s a list of options:

    • If your teenaged years were plagued with acne, we can help reduce the appearance of acne scars. We offer Bellafill, an in-office treatment that requires no downtime and leaves you with much smoother skin.
    • We provide many different treatments to help you achieve a more youthful look. Belotero can rid you of wrinkles and lines for almost a year, and Botox helps get rid of eye, brow, and forehead wrinkles. Radiesse is considered a mini-lift, and we offer two different varieties of JUVÉDERM. JUVÉDERM XC uses gel to fill in the area around the nose and mouth and provide a youthful, natural-looking appearance, while JUVÉDERM VOLUMA™ XC is a treatment that’s most effective for older women, and is injected solely into the cheeks. Chemical Peels provide amazing results for your skin, getting rid of not just wrinkles but also acne.
    • If acne is your primary concern, there are treatments for that, too. In addition to Chemical Peels, we offer IPL Photorejuvenation Therapy with Lumenis One®, a laser treatment that removes blemishes from your face, neck, hands, and upper chest. VBeam Perfecta Pulsed Dye Laser is another option for ridding your skin of blemishes, and it can also be used to treat warts and psoriasis.
    • We can take care of your stubborn double chin. If you’ve tried exercise and dieting, but still can’t seem to get the sculpted chin you desire, we offer Kybella, a treatment that ruptures fat cells to firm up your chin.
    • Unsightly spider veins on your legs are no problem for us. We provide Sclerotherapy, a quick treatment for spider veins that causes minimal discomfort.
    • If you’re embarrassed by unwanted hair, we can help. Laser Hair Removal will give you the smooth, hairless skin you’ve always wanted.
    • Ask us about your other cosmetic concerns. We can treat many conditions, including skin tags, brown spots, fine blood vessels on the face, and more.

    If you’d like more detailed information, we’re happy to answer any questions you may have. At Swinyer-Woseth Dermatology, we’re committed to providing superior, professional skincare in a manner that’s practical and efficient, yet compassionate. With more than 30 years of experience providing dermatological services in Salt Lake City, we provide a wide range of services, from cosmetic skincare to treatment for skin cancer. Our team of board-certified dermatologists and licensed cosmetic service providers, along with our friendly staff, are here to provide you the care you need in a comfortable and professional atmosphere. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact us through our website or call (801) 682-4715 today.